The Best Guide Synthetic Indices

Synthetic indices are financial instruments that simulate the performance of a real stock market index, commodity, or other asset without actually holding the underlying assets. Instead, synthetic indices use a combination of various financial instruments such as futures, options, and swaps to create a replica of the underlying asset’s performance.

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These instruments are often traded through online platforms and have become increasingly popular in recent years due to their accessibility and ease of use. Synthetic indices offer traders and investors exposure to a diverse range of markets without the need for specialized knowledge or access to specific exchanges.
It is important to note that synthetic indices carry their own unique risks, and traders should carefully consider these risks before investing. Like all financial instruments, synthetic indices can experience significant fluctuations in value and carry the potential for significant losses. As with any investment, it is important to conduct thorough research and seek professional advice before investing in synthetic indices.

The Best Synthetic Indices and Forex Brokers in South Africa

Broker
Rating
Regulated
Bonus
Min. Deposit
Avg. Returns
1.
IQ Option

CySEC

up to 100%

$30

70% - 90%

2.
Deriv

ASIC

up to 100%

$100

70% - 90%

3.
Olympic Trade

FinaCom

up to 100%

$100

70% - 90%

4.
Quotex

IFMRRC

up to 100%

$10

90% - 100%

5.
Markets.com

FSCA

up to 100%

$250

70% - 95%

6.
Fxcc

CIF

up to 100%

$200

90% - 100%

7.
Eagle FX

Global

up to 100%

$200

90% - 100%

8.
Etoro

EU, AU, USA,UK

up to 100%

$10

90% - 100%

9.
Pocket Option

IFMRRC

up to 100%

$100

90% - 100%

10.
Exness

CySEC

up to 100%

$150

90% - 100%

To open a synthetic indices account, you will typically need to follow these steps:

  1. Choose a broker: Research and compare different brokers that offer access to synthetic indices. Look for brokers with low fees, a good track record of performance, and a platform that meets your needs.
  2. Open an account: Once you have chosen a broker, you will need to open an account. This typically involves providing personal information and verifying your identity.
  3. Fund your account: You will need to deposit funds into your account in order to start investing in synthetic indices. Some brokers may have minimum deposit requirements.
  4. Choose a synthetic index: Once your account is funded, you can choose a synthetic index that aligns with your investment goals and risk tolerance.
  5. Buy the ETF or mutual fund that tracks the index: Once you have selected a synthetic index, you can buy the exchange-traded fund (ETF) or mutual fund that tracks the index through your broker’s platform

To withdraw funds from a synthetic indices broker, you will typically need to follow these steps:

  1. Log in to your account: Log in to your broker’s platform using your username and password.
  2. Navigate to the withdrawal section: Navigate to the withdrawal section of your account, which is typically located in the “funding” or “my account” section.
  3. Choose your withdrawal method: Select your preferred withdrawal method from the available options. This may include bank transfer, credit card, or online payment services like PayPal.
  4. Enter the withdrawal amount: Enter the amount you wish to withdraw. Some brokers may have minimum withdrawal amounts.
  5. Confirm the withdrawal: Review the withdrawal details and confirm the transaction. Your broker may require additional verification steps, such as providing a government-issued ID or proof of address.
  6. Wait for the funds to arrive: Once your withdrawal request is approved, it may take several business days for the funds to arrive in your bank account or other chosen withdrawal method.

Forex VS Indices

  • Underlying assets: Forex trading involves buying and selling currencies, while synthetic indices are designed to replicate the performance of a group of assets, such as a stock market index, commodity, or bond index.
  • Market hours: The forex market is open 24 hours a day, 5 days a week, while the trading hours for synthetic indices may be limited to specific times when the underlying assets are actively traded.
  • Volatility: Forex trading is generally considered to be a more volatile investment, with potentially larger gains and losses over short periods of time. Synthetic indices may offer a more stable investment option with more modest gains and losses over longer periods of time.
  • Leverage: Forex trading often involves high levels of leverage, which can amplify gains or losses. Synthetic indices may offer lower levels of leverage, depending on the broker and the specific index being traded.
  • Fees: Both forex and synthetic indices may involve fees, such as spreads, commissions, or expense ratios for ETFs or mutual funds that track the indices.

 Types of synthetic indices, including:

  1. Equity indices: These synthetic indices track the performance of a basket of equities. For example, the S&P 500 Index tracks the performance of 500 large-cap U.S. stocks.
  2. Commodity indices: These synthetic indices track the performance of a basket of commodities such as oil, gold, or agricultural products. For example, the Bloomberg Commodity Index tracks the performance of 23 commodities.
  3. Currency indices: These synthetic indices track the performance of a basket of currencies. For example, the U.S. Dollar Index tracks the performance of the dollar against a basket of six currencies.
  4. Fixed income indices: These synthetic indices track the performance of a basket of fixed income securities such as bonds. For example, the Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index tracks the performance of the U.S. investment-grade bond market.
  5. Volatility indices: These synthetic indices track the implied volatility of an underlying asset or market. For example, the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) tracks the implied volatility of the S&P 500 Index.
  6. Alternative indices: These synthetic indices track the performance of alternative asset classes such as hedge funds, private equity, or real estate. For example, the HFRX Global Hedge Fund Index tracks the performance of hedge funds globally.

 

Synthetic indices are financial products that track the performance of a group of assets without holding the actual assets themselves. They can be created using various methods, such as using mathematical algorithms, statistical models, or market data. Here are some types of synthetic indices:

  1. Basket Synthetic Indices: These indices are composed of a basket of underlying assets, and their value is calculated by tracking the performance of those assets.
  2. Sector Synthetic Indices: These indices track the performance of a specific sector, such as technology, healthcare, or energy.
  3. Commodity Synthetic Indices: These indices track the performance of a specific commodity or a basket of commodities, such as gold, silver, or crude oil.
  4. Volatility Synthetic Indices: These indices track the level of volatility in a specific market, such as the VIX index that tracks the volatility of the S&P 500 index.
  5. Currency Synthetic Indices: These indices track the performance of a currency against a basket of other currencies, such as the US dollar index that tracks the performance of the US dollar against a basket of major currencies.
  6. Style Synthetic Indices: These indices track the performance of a particular investment style, such as value or growth, by using a combination of fundamental and technical indicators.

Here are some common terms related to indices:

  • Underlying asset: The asset or group of assets that the synthetic index is designed to replicate.
  • Derivative: A financial instrument that derives its value from an underlying asset or group of assets.
  • Futures contract: A derivative contract that obligates the buyer to purchase an underlying asset at a specific price and time in the future.
  • Options contract: A derivative contract that gives the buyer the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an underlying asset at a specific price and time in the future.
  • Swap: A derivative contract that involves the exchange of cash flows based on the performance of an underlying asset or group of assets.
  • Tracking error: The difference between the performance of the synthetic index and the performance of the underlying asset or group of assets it is designed to replicate.
  • Counterparty risk: The risk that the counterparty to a derivative contract may default on their obligations.
  • Liquidity risk: The risk that it may be difficult to buy or sell a derivative contract at a fair price.
  • Expense ratio: The annual fee charged by an exchange-traded fund (ETF) or mutual fund that tracks a synthetic index.
  • Rebalancing: The process of adjusting the composition of a synthetic index to maintain its target exposure to the underlying asset or group of assets.

If you’re considering investing in indices

  1. Understand the underlying assets: Before investing in a synthetic index, make sure you understand the underlying assets that the index tracks. This will help you evaluate the potential risks and returns of the investment.
  2. Consider the index methodology: Each index has its own methodology for calculating returns, rebalancing, and including or excluding assets. Make sure you understand the methodology of the index you’re considering and how it might impact your investment.
  3. Watch out for fees: Synthetic indices are often offered through exchange-traded funds (ETFs) or mutual funds, which may charge management fees or other expenses. Be aware of these fees and factor them into your decision-making process.
  4. Diversify your portfolio: Synthetic indices can be a useful tool for diversifying your portfolio, but they should not be the only investment in your portfolio. Consider investing in a mix of stocks, bonds, and other asset classes to reduce your overall risk.
  5. Stay informed: Keep up with news and market trends that may impact the performance of the underlying assets in the index. This can help you make informed decisions about when to buy, hold, or sell your investment.
  6. Consult a financial advisor: If you’re unsure about investing in synthetic indices, or if you need help creating a diversified portfolio, consider consulting a financial advisor. They can provide personalized advice based on your financial goals and risk tolerance.

Synthetic indices: Faqs

What is a synthetic index?

A synthetic index is a financial instrument that replicates the performance of an underlying asset or basket of assets. Synthetic indices are often used by investors to gain exposure to a particular market or asset class without having to buy individual securities.

How are indices created?

Synthetic indices are typically created using derivatives such as futures, options, or swaps. The value of the synthetic index is based on the performance of the underlying assets or the price of the derivatives used to create the index.

What are some advantages of investing in indices?

Some advantages of investing in synthetic indices include diversification, lower transaction costs, and the ability to gain exposure to markets or asset classes that may be difficult to access directly.

What are some risks associated with investing in synthetic indices?

Some risks associated with investing in synthetic indices include counterparty risk, liquidity risk, and the potential for tracking error. Additionally, synthetic indices may be more complex than traditional investments, so it’s important to understand the risks before investing.

How do synthetic indices differ from traditional indices?

Traditional indices are often based on the market capitalization of individual stocks or bonds. Synthetic indices, on the other hand, are created using derivatives and do not necessarily reflect the actual market capitalization of the underlying assets.

Can individual investors buy and sell  indices?

Yes, individual investors can buy and sell synthetic indices through exchange-traded funds (ETFs) or mutual funds that track the index. These funds are typically available through brokerage accounts.